The three forms of linear equations you have studied are slope-intercept form, point-slope form, and standard form. Explain when each form is most use

Efan Halliday 2021-06-11 Answered
The three forms of linear equations you have studied are slope-intercept form, point-slope form, and standard form. Explain when each form is most useful.
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komunidadO
Answered 2021-06-12 Author has 86 answers

If we have the slope m and the y-intercept b, then we should use the slope-intercept form y=mx+6
If we have the slope m and the point (x1,y1), then we should use the point-slope form yy1=m(xx1)
If we have the x-intercept and the y-intercept , then we should use the standard form Ax+By=C
Where x-intercept is - and y-intercept is CB

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