Based on a smartphone survey, assume that 41 % of adults with smartphones use them in theaters. In a separate survey of 275 adults with smartphones, i

Tabansi 2021-05-26 Answered
Based on a smartphone​ survey, assume that 41​% of adults with smartphones use them in theaters. In a separate survey of 275 adults with​ smartphones, it is found that 112 use them in theaters. a. If the 41​% rate is​ correct, find the probability of getting 112 or fewer smartphone owners who use them in theaters. b. Is the result of 112 significantly​ low?

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SchulzD
Answered 2021-05-27 Author has 8882 answers
(a) 0.4641=46.41%
(b) No
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