How many lines of symmetry does the figure shown at the right have? A) 0 B) 1 C) 5 D) 10

Question
Analytic geometry
asked 2020-11-02
How many lines of symmetry does the figure shown at the right have?
A) 0
B) 1
C) 5
D) 10

Answers (1)

2020-11-03
No. The shape has only 1 line of symmetry which is a vertical line passing through the upper and lower vertices. (Recall that a line of symmetry divides a figure into two figures that are mirror images.)
0

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