To calculate:To evaluate (f*g)(70) and (g*f)(70). Professor Harsh gave a test to his college algebra class and nobody got more than 80 points (out of

Daniaal Sanchez 2020-10-27 Answered
To calculate:To evaluate \((f*g)(70)\ and\ (g*f)(70)\).
Professor Harsh gave a test to his college algebra class and nobody got more than 80 points (out of 100) on the test.
One problem worth 8 points had insufficient data, so nobody could solve that problem.
The professor adjusted the grades for the class by
a. Increasing everyone's score by 10% and
b. Giving everyone 8 bonus points
c. x represents the original score of a student

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Expert Answer

unett
Answered 2020-10-28 Author has 11211 answers
The function \(f(x) = 1\).larepresents the score increased by 10%
The function \(g(x) = x + 8\) represents the score increased by 8 points
The function \((f*g)(x) = 1.1(x + 8)\) represents the final score when the score is first increased by 8 bonus points and then by 10%
The function \((f*g)(x) = 1.1x + 8\) represents the final score when the score is first increased by 10% and then by 8 bonus points
Calculation:
Consider \((f*g)(x) = 1.1(x+8)\)
Plugging x= 70 in the above equation,
\((f*g)(x) = 1.1(70 +8) = 1.1 (78) = 85.8\)
Consider \((g*f)(x) = 1.1x +8\)
Plugging x = 70 in the above equation,
\((g*f)(x) = 1.1(70) +8 =77+8=85\).
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